Anh-Susann Pham Thi

Anh-Susann Pham Thi

Anh-Susann Pham Thi is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of Manchester. Her research is looking at resistance in contemporary Vietnam. Research interests include Marxist social movement theories, Eurocentrism and everyday politics in the Global South.

Carl Death

Carl Death

Carl’s research has been primarily located at the intersection of three fields: African politics and development (particularly post-apartheid South Africa), environmental politics and sustainable development, and critical theories, particularly Foucauldian governmentality analysis. An important contribution of his work to the field of governmentality studies has been a focus upon the constitutive role of dissent, protest and resistance, in particular through Foucault’s concept of ‘counter-conducts’.

Recent books include Governing Sustainable Development: Partnerships, Protests and Power at the World Summit (Routledge, 2010) and two edited collections, Critical Environmental Politics (Routledge, 2014), and Critical Perspectives on African Politics: Liberal interventions, state-building and civil society(Routledge, 2014, with Clive Gabay).

M@M Contributions | Univ. Manchester

Claudia Schütz

Claudia Schütz

I currently work as a project assistant at the Department of Sociology at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, funded by the Tyrolean Research Fund. My research interests include political sociology, protest and social movement research, critical theory and qualitative research methods. I am a member of the Institute of Protest and Movement Research (ipb) in Berlin and the ipb working group “Theories of Social Movements”. Also, I am board member of the Research Network “Social Movements” of the European Sociological Association (ESA). In my PhD thesis I engage with the recent wave of protests in democratic states and transformations on the social normative/moral bases as a prerequisite for collective mobilization. Here, I particularly focus on the Gezi protests in Turkey and the Indignados movement in Spain. My master thesis dealt with the German civil protest movement Stuttgart 21 and was awarded as outstanding sociological master thesis by the Austrian Society for Sociology.

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Colin Barker

Colin Barker

I’m a retired lecturer at Manchester Metropolitan University, currently enjoying ‘honorary’ status. Since the early 1960s, I have been a member of the Socialist Workers Party, formerly the International Socialists. Since 1995, I have been one of the organizers of the (almost) annual International Conferences on Alternative Futures and Popular Protest, held around Easter at Manchester Metropolitan University. The next edition is planned for 14-16 April 2014. I have written widely on Marxism including, most recently, in the book Marxism and Social Movements. I’m married with two grown-up daughters.

M@M Contributions | Personal Website

Cristiana Olcese

Cristiana Olcese

Lecturer in Sociology

Cristiana is a Lecturer in Sociology at Manchester.  She is interested in how social movements intersect culture and the everyday. Her current research explores the embodied and material nature of everyday politics. Her project compares cases of everyday practices and experiences in the fields of art, health, education, and recreational activities and illustrates how and under what circumstances they yield political relevance. She has published a number of articles and contributed to a few books.

Gemma Edwards

Gemma Edwards

I am a senior lecturer in Sociology at the University of Manchester, UK, where I have worked since 2007, and an editor of the journal Social Movement Studies. I have conducted research into historical and contemporary protest movements, from the strikes of firefighters and teacher trade unionists, to the militancy of suffragettes. I am co-investigator on two current projects at Manchester. The first is a Leverhulme grant with Mitchell Centre for SNA colleagues, looking at how covert networks (like those involved in militant activism and terrorism) operate. The second is an ESRC project Under the Same Roof , looking at contemporary forms of shared living, with a particular focus on housing cooperatives and interpersonal networks. I have recently published Social Movements and Protest (Cambridge University Press, 2014)

M@M Contributions | Univ. Manchester

Helen Underhill

Helen Underhill

Helen is a PhD candidate in the School of Environment, Education and Development at the University of Manchester. Her research examines diasporic mobilisation in the Egyptian uprisings, focusing on social movement learning and the political trajectories of activists. With a background in education and being based in the Institute for Development, Policy and Management (IDPM), she is particularly interested in learning for social change within developing and post-conflict contexts. She is a member of two research groups: Social Theories in Development and the recently formed Humanitarianism and Development

Hilary Pilkington

Hilary Pilkington

Hilary Pilkington is Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester and Fellow of the UK Academy of Social Sciences. She has been coordinator or principal investigator of over a dozen large research grants involving multiple international partners. She is currently coordinator of the H2020 DARE (Dialogue about Radicalisation and Equality) project, which considers the social origins and effects of radicalisation, focusing on young people and on both Islamist and anti-Islam(ist) (extreme right) radicalisations. She is also a member of the coordinating team of the H2020 PROMISE (PROmoting youth Involvement and Social Engagement: Opportunities and challenges for ‘conflicted’ young people across Europe) project, as part of which she is engaged in a study of young Muslims’ responses to the UK government PREVENT programme. Her most recent publications include: Pilkington, H. (2016) Loud and Proud: Passion and Politics in the English Defence League, Manchester: Manchester University Press (winner of the BBC Thinking Allowed Ethnography Award, 2016); Pilkington, H. (2017) ‘Employing meta-ethnography in the analysis of qualitative data sets: A new tool for transnational research projects?’, Qualitative Research (May 2017). DOI: 10.1177/1468794117707805; Pilkington, H. ‘‘EDL Angels stand beside not behind their men’:  the politics of gender and sexuality in an anti-Islam(ist) movement, Gender and Education 29 (2): 238-57. Hilary is currently a Commissioner on the Tackling Violent Extremism and Promoting Social Cohesion Commission which seeks to develop a Greater Manchester approach to preventing hateful extremism and strengthening community cohesion.

M@M Contributions | Univ. Manchester

Jaime Echavarri Valdez

Jaime Echavarri Valdez

Jaime Echávarri is a Phd Student at The University of Manchester – IDPM. His research is looking at how teachers in elementary education in Mexico acquire and create ICT knowledge in different contexts of scarce ICT teacher education policies.

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Jamie Matthews

Jamie Matthews

Jamie is a lecturer in sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London. His research is concerned with understanding the discourses and practices of movements in the post-crash era, with a particular interest in questions of movement territory, the grassroots of populism, and the role of speech in the organisation of collectivity. Jamie completed his PhD at the University of Manchester, an ethnographic study of Occupy London, building on his own participation in that movement over three years.

M@M Contributions | Academia.edu

Joseph Ibrahim

Joseph Ibrahim

Joseph is senior lecturer in Sociology and director of the Global Inequalities research programme at Leeds Beckett University. He is a political sociologist who has research interests in social and political theory, social movements, political mobilizations, collective action and community values. His research to date has been focused on the political culture and dynamics of consensus and conflict within groups. He has recently completed projects on the application of social theory for understanding social movement dynamics, the politics of the alternative globalization movement, student politics and protests, and social movement emergence after the global financial crash.

Joseph has published a research monograph, Bourdieu and Social Movements: Ideological struggles of the British Anti-capitalist movement: Palgrave, numerous peer reviewed journal articles, and he has been the guest editor of two special issues of the journal Contention: The multidisciplinary journal of social protest. He currently sits on the editorial board for the journal Sociological Research Online and the editorial review board for the book series Transforming Capitalism: Rowman and Littlefield publishers.

Joseph’s current research projects are on student politicization and left-wing political mobilizations in times of austerity. He is currently writing chapters for and co-editing (with Dr John Roberts, Brunel University) a two volume collection for a book on left-wing movements and political parties in the 21st century. This is to be published by Routledge for the Radical History and Politics series.

Joseph Maslen

Joseph Maslen

Joseph Maslen is a senior lecturer in education at Liverpool Hope University, where he is based within the University’s Centre for Education & Policy Analysis. His research explores UK discourses of social mobility, social cohesion and youthful rebellion through the lenses of contemporary politics and history.

M@M Contributions | Academia.Edu | Twitter | LinkedIn

Kevin Gillan

Kevin Gillan

Kevin Gillan is a lecturer in sociology at the University of Manchester and Editor in Chief at the journal Social Movement Studies. He has interests that overlap between social movements scholarship and economic sociology. Kevin’s most recent books are Research Ethics and Social Movements: Scholarship, Activism and Knowledge Production and Occupy! A Global Movement.

M@M Contributions | Univ. Manchester | Academia.edu

Luke Yates

Luke Yates

Blog Editor

Luke Yates is a Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Manchester. His research looks at the relationships between politics and everyday life.

M@M Contributions | Univ. Manchester | Academia.Edu

Matteo Tiratelli

Matteo Tiratelli

Matteo is a Teaching Fellow at UCL and Secretary of Battersea constituency Labour Party. Currently researching power, protest and violence in the modern state and campaigning for democratic socialism

https://matteotiratelli.wordpress.com/

Matthew Flinders

Matthew Flinders

Matthew Flinders is Professor of Politics at the University of Sheffield and Founding Director of the Sir Bernard Crick Centre for the Public Understanding of Politics. He is also Chair of the Political Studies Association of the United Kingdom. His recent books include Defending Politics (2012, OUP), Democratic Drift (2009, OUP) and Walking Without Order (2008, OUP).

M@M Contributions | Univ. Sheffield

Meghan Tinsley

Meghan Tinsley

Meghan is a Presidential Fellow in Ethnicity and Inequalities at the University of Manchester, with research focusing on race, nationalism, and violence. She is currently working on two projects: the first is a monograph on representations of Muslims in commemorations of the First World War, and the second analyses discourses on race and police violence against black civilians. Meghan’s previous research has addressed language and nationalist movements in Guinea-Conakry and Reunion Island.

http://www.meghantinsley.com

Nick Crossley

Nick Crossley

Nick is a professor of sociology in the department of sociology. He is currently interested in the role of social networks in collective action and the uses of social network analysis for exploring this. He has published a number of articles on social movements and also two books: Making Sense of Social Movements (Open University, 2002) and Contesting Psychiatry (Routledge, 2006).

M@M Contributions | Univ. Manchester

Pete Lampard

Pete Lampard

Lecturer in Sociology

Pete is a lecturer in sociology. His interests centre largely upon understandings of culture within social movements, and in particular understanding the materiality of culture.

Polyp

Polyp

Polyp has been drawing political cartoons since the 1980s – many will know him for his regular features in New Internationalist or his frequent work with environmental and social justice groups. You can find out more at his website: www.polyp.org.uk.

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Raphael Schlembach

Raphael Schlembach

Raphael Schlembach is a lecturer in criminology at the University of Brighton. He received his PhD from the University of Manchester in 2010, where he was supervised by Nick Crossley and Nick Thoburn. His primary research interests are in social movement theory, European movements, and the policing of protest.

M@M Contributions | Univ. BrightonAcademia.edu

Simin Fadaee

Simin Fadaee

I am a lecturer in Sociology at the University of Manchester. I have researched social movements and environmentalism in a number of places but mostly in Iran and India. I am the author of Social Movements in Iran: Environmentalism and Civil Society (Routledge 2012) and the editor of Understanding Southern Social Movements (Routledge 2016). I serve as a board member of the Research Committee on Social Classes and Social Movements (RC 47) of the International Sociological Association.

Sophie Lewis

Sophie Lewis

Sophie Lewis is a third-year PhD researcher in Human Geography at SEED, working with Noel Castree and Erik Swyngedouw on her thesis – by publication – on gestation-as-labour in the contemporary reproductive technology industry. Her most recent article surveys the limits of antisurrogacy and technophobic feminisms. Another, addressing the “repro-normative” TV and press mediations of the surrogacy industry by one prominent Indian clinician, is forthcoming in Public Culture. Additionally, her chapter on ‘care politics’ and surrogates’ struggle appears in the new Palgrave collection Intimate Economies (June 2016). She writes on politics/ecology with the Out of the Woods collective. Her review essay on Kalindi Vora’s Life Support can be read in Antipode.

M@M Contributions

Susan O'Shea

Susan O'Shea

My primary research interests apply dynamic social network analysis in social movement settings using a mixed-methods framework. I combine quantitative social network analysis with on-line social media, participatory research methods, archive, and survey methods to investigate movement change over time. During my Doctoral research I used these methods to examine UK based feminist social movements, in particular the Ladyfest movement. Ladyfest is an umbrella term for a not-for-profit woman-centred music festival and a signifier for an expanding transnational, music and cultural feminist social movement. Both the movement, as a process, and the festival, as one of the tangible outcomes, aim to create a safe space for women to take ownership of and participate in music, creative activities, political debate and gender based activism. The thesis applied Howard Becker’s concept of art worlds in order to assess the role networks play in the gendered political economy of popular culture and music and to understand how feminist activists resist the mainstream by creating networked counter-cultural music worlds through alternative performance, production and reception practices. In the future I plan to extend this research topic, employing similar methods and techniques, to look at other related feminist music movements such as Riot Grrrl, Rock Camp for Girls, and Queer music scenes.

M@M ContributionsAcademia.edu

Tang Yun-Tong

Tang Yun-Tong

Tang Yun-Tong is a PhD student at the University of Manchester, researching the impact of political culture on pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong. His research interests include social movements, cultural politics of emotions, social and cultural theories, and urban politics.

Tom Redshaw

Tom Redshaw

I am in the final stages of my PhD at the University of Manchester, where I have been studying the development of crypto-currencies in social contexts across the UK, as well as two cases in Barcelona and Prague. I am primarily interested in spaces where technological innovation meets political ideology, and efforts to democratise technology.

Ulrike Flader

Ulrike Flader

Blog Editor

Ulrike received her PhD from the Department of Sociology at the University of Manchester. Her ethnographic research focusses on everyday resistance practices of the Kurdish population in Turkey. Drawing from the notions of power and resistance in the work of Michel Foucault and Judith Butler, she analyses forms of everyday resistance against state policies of assimilation. Although her research locates resistance on the micro-level of the everyday beyond party politics, collective protest or armed struggle, she is interested in the intersections between everyday resistance and the organised social movements.

M@M Contributions